Stress & Oral Habits

This section is dedicated to the latest information on oral health topics, culled from authoritative sources such as the American Dental Association.

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Heart Disease

Poor dental hygiene can cause a host of problems outside your mouth-including your heart. Medical research has uncovered a definitive link between heart disease and certain kinds of oral infections such as periodontal disease. Some have even suggested that gum disease may be as dangerous as or more dangerous than other factors such as tobacco use. A condition called chronic periodontitis, or persistent gum disease, has been linked to cardiovascular problems by medical researchers.

In short, infections and harmful bacteria in your mouth can spread through the bloodstream to your liver, which produces harmful proteins that can lead to systemic cardiac problems. That's why it is critical to practice good oral hygiene to keep infections at bay-this includes a daily regimen of brushing, flossing and rinsing.


Antibiotic Prophylaxis

In some cases, patients with compromised immune systems or who fear an infection from a dental procedure may take antibiotics before visiting the dentist.

It is possible for bacteria from your mouth to enter your bloodstream during a dental procedure in which tissues are cut or bleeding occurs. A healthy immune system will normally fight such bacteria before they result in an infection. However, certain cardiovascular conditions in patients with weakened hearts could be at risk for an infection or heart muscle inflammation (bacterial endocarditis) resulting from a dental procedure.

Patients with heart conditions (including weakened heart valves) are strongly advised to inform our office before undergoing any dental procedure. The proper antibiotic will prevent any unnecessary complications.


Dentistry Health Care That Works: Tobacco

The American Dental Association has long been a leader in the battle against tobacco-related disease, working to educate the public about the dangers inherent in tobacco use and encouraging dentists to help their patients break the cycle of addiction. The Association has continually strengthened and updated its tobacco policies as new scientific information has become available.

Smoking and Implants

Recent studies have shown that there is a direct link between oral tissue and bones loss and smoking. Tooth loss and edentulism are more common in smokers than in non-smokers. In addition, people who smoke are more likely to develop severe periodontal disease.

The formation of deep mucosal pockets with inflammation of the peri-implant mucosa around dental implants is called peri-implantitis. Smokers treated with dental implants have a greater risk of developing peri-implantitis. This condition can lead to increased resorption of peri-implant bone. If left untreated, peri-implantitis can lead to implant failure. In a recent international study, smokers showed a higher score in bleeding index with greater peri-implant pocket depth and radiographically discernible bone resorption around the implant, particularly in the maxilla.

Many studies have shown that smoking can lead to higher rates of dental implant failure. In general, smoking cessation usually leads to improved periodontal health and a patient’s chance for successful implant acceptance.


External Links

Tooth wear.Teeth grinding and clenching are common habits, but that doesn't mean they are harmless. Stresses from the powerful forces generated by grinding and clenching (also known as “bruxing”) can wear down teeth or even loosen them. Teeth that have enamel worn away or scraped off from this repeated rubbing action may become sensitive to hot or cold. And dental work such as crowns and fillings may get damaged. Bruxism can also lead to jaw pain and/or headaches.

Even if you have experienced some of these signs and symptoms, you may not realize you are a bruxer — particularly if your habit is nocturnal, as is often the case. Yet the evidence of tooth damage may become obvious during your regular checkup and cleaning. Dentists can also help you break the habit, relieve any pain you are experiencing, and repair any damage to your teeth or dental work.

Why do we grind or clench our teeth?

The most common reason for grinding/clenching habits is stress, which can affect our health in various ways. Some people experience stomach pain or skin breakouts; bruxing is yet another manifestation. Sometimes people grind their teeth because of misaligned teeth or other bite problems. Using stimulating substances such as caffeine, alcohol, tobacco and illegal drugs can also put you at risk. Additionally, teeth grinding is believed to be an uncommon side effect of certain medications.

What can be done?

Sometimes simply becoming aware of the habit can help you to get it under control. If stress is the issue, try to find healthy ways of managing it: exercise, meditation, listening to relaxing music, or a warm bath may help. Your teeth will be monitored over time at the dental office to make sure the problem is not worsening.

Custom nightguard.If damage to your teeth or existing dental work is evident, we may recommend a custom-made nightguard, also known as an “occlusal guard,” may be recommended. It resembles an athletic mouthguard. Made of comfortable plastic, the guard is worn at night to keep your teeth from actually contacting each other. It also helps protect your jaw joints from excessive force.

If a bite problem exists where some teeth are hitting before the others (all of your teeth should hit at the same time), it can sometimes be treated by removing a tiny bit of enamel from an individual tooth that is sticking up a bit (and therefore receiving too much force) to bring it in line with the others. This is known as a bite adjustment. If your malocclusion (bad bite) is more serious, orthodontics might be recommended. Replacing any teeth that are missing can also help stabilize your bite by inhibiting the shifting of teeth that occurs when extra space is left open by missing teeth.

A word about kids: Teeth grinding is very common in children, especially when they are shedding their baby teeth. Since they often outgrow it, treatment is not usually recommended.

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